Berlin Science Talk
Berlin Science Talk

Berlin Science Talk

Berlin is an international city of culture, media and science. It boasts of a long, cherished history of scientific excellence, with some of the world’s brilliant minds, like Albert Einstein, Alexander von Humboldt and Max Planck, being closely associated with it. Therefore, not surprisingly, today, the German capital is one of the largest and most diverse scientific regions in Europe and worldwide. Continuing with the tradition of hosting centres of scientific excellence, Berlin is now home to five excellent universities, eight universities of applied science, four art colleges, up to 30 universities of cooperative education, 22 technology parks and business incubators and over 70 non-university research institutes. It also has one of Germany’s oldest and largest hospital, namely, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin.

Since Berlin acts as a cradle for so many centres of scientific excellence, it serves as a goldmine for numerous discussions and exchange of ideas, that can surely promote a strong, collaborative network of scientists and researchers working with each other for a better world. A quick look at the highly appreciated pieces of scientific work in the recent years, it is more than evident that the definition of research has shifted drastically from an “individual” contribution, to “collaborative” research. However, this is only a small part of an even bigger picture. A well connected research community doesn’t only ensure smooth and effective exchange of ideas among its peers, but, it also provides a platform for young and highly motivated individuals to set a strong foothold in the scientific community. Very often, we see talented people left behind, not because they aren’t deserving enough, rather, mostly because they have no means or platform to get the information that they need the most, namely, open positions (Masters, PhD, post-docs, internships etc) and scholarships.

Therefore, “Berlin Science Talk” aims to bring together past, present and future PhDs, and other experts to improve our academic network. We would meet regularly in a casual manner, have some drinks together and talk about any topic you may be interested in: thesis writing, teaching, lab work, publishing, alternative career paths, academia, and job searching... you name it!

The German capital has a high standard of living. It is truly international and has a unique cultural range with a huge music and theatre scene. Graduates can expect a most inspiring and intriguing working and living environment.

Become a part of Berlin’s vibrant research community!



Events

BerlinScienceTalk

PhD Networking and Socialization
(First weekend of every month)

When meeting someone for the first time, whether another PhD student, or a renowned scientist, nothing breaks the ice like eating pancakes or having drinks together. A social atmosphere provides a relaxed, informal environment where people can connect, share ideas, and form collaborations. Being able to build a network and thrive in a social environment is crucial to a successful scientific career. Berlin Science Talk brings young researchers, PhD students, Postdocs and scientists together to build a strong academic, industrial and social network in an informal setting.

In a multidisciplinary research field, it is crucial to have an environment where scientists can connect and communicate directly. PhD students and postdocs will often work in a research group that consists of scientists with diverse educational backgrounds. It is necessary to create a supporting network that can be called on to share experiences. Moreover, a solid network becomes a crucial element for future collaborations and taking the next steps in one’s career. Since young researchers may have less exposure to the scientific network, social events could be immensely helpful in boosting their career. These events ensure more interaction between the participants thus allowing scientists to communicate their research and ideas effectively. A social event can be as much about making friends as it is about sharing research. Ultimately though, the connection made may lead back to better science and increased opportunities for collaboration. The phrase ‘‘practice makes perfect’’ applies to many situations, and socializing is no exception. The greater the exposure to socializing opportunities, the better one’s communication skills get, which is a vital skill in science.

Berlin Science Talk gives an opportunity to meet every Friday evening with many research scholars from various disciplines. So, pack some food and drinks and, lets enjoy the Friday evening together!!!





BerlinScienceTalk

Berlin Science Talk : Explain Your Research
(Every month)

"Berlin Science Talk" provides a platform to young researchers and scientists to talk about their research to a diverse audience. In doing so, it promotes them to think "out of the box" for communicating their research work so that everyone in the audience understands it, irrespective of their academic background, and at the same time, does not dilute the importance of their research, or make it sound very lame. At this point, one might wonder, why is it so important? Well, to begin with, this will prepare young researchers to always be on-point and confident enough to communicate their research to anyone, whether its academics from a completely different background, or students embarking on their bachelor studies. And, not to mention, the extreme happiness and satisfaction of people remembering you not as a stereotypical "nerdy scientist", but, rather, as someone who could introduce them to the fascinating and overwhelmingly interesting world of scientific research.

So, here we are, providing you with a platform to present your research work in an interesting and entertaining way that will keep it etched in the audience's memory.

Now, lets get into some details - In this event, participants will get maximum 10 minutes each to present their research work. In this time frame, the speaker has to get the main "take home message" of their research across to the audience in the most entertaining and innovative way possible. They can do so through powerpoint presentations, or even demonstrate their work by "live" experiments if possible.

So, do you think you can tickle everyone's grey cells and make them fall for your research work? What are you waiting for?

Please send the title of your talk with a short description at berlinsciencetalk@gmail.com.





BerlinScienceTalk

Postdoc or Industry?
Choices and opportunities for PhDs in the AI revolution
(June 26, 2018)

You are a PhD or Postdoc wondering what your next move should be? You are looking to better understand what a move to industry would mean for you? You have been internationally mobile and need more insight?

Let's speak for 90 minutes about the following issues.

1. If pursuing a postdoc career, what do I need to watch out for? How do I find out what my chances are of making tenure? When do I get out before it is too late? 2. In considering a switch to industry, what do I need to do to get interviews and find the best job? How do I start the search? 3. If I have been mobile internationally, and perhaps don't speak German (fluently), how do I move forward nevertheless?

Our guest speaker: Dr. Chris Armbruster is a Max Planck alumnus who is supporting PhD talent in transitioning to new challenges in Data & AI. Earlier, he worked on innovation systems (including postdoc careers), and rolled out digital infrstructures to the MPI. Chris is from Berlin but spent much of his life abroad in Africa, Asia, and Europe. He runs the campaign 10,000 Data Scientists for Europe and would like to hear from you if you are interested in Data & AI.





BerlinScienceTalk

Online job applications for PhDs transitioning to Industry
(August 10, 2018)

In Germany, about 3 million people are looking for jobs at any given day. Despite their qualifications, many PhDs face challenges in landing industry positions they are well-qualified for. This is due to a lack of understanding of the online job application process that most applicants are unaware of.

In this workshop, career advisors from INTRVU will share how the online application process works and identify key pitfalls. They will also share structured job application and tracking strategies to increase your chances of getting your applications reviewed by the hiring personnel. They will also provide an overview of the tools to build a professional candidate persona, profile your application kit and identify improvement hotspots. Workshop participants will be introduced to INTRVU's H3 framework to critically review and revise their application documents. This workshop will conclude with a walkthrough of the free resources and knowledge base available on INTRVU website and an open discussion on INTRVU's career services packages.

Guest Speaker: Raman Venkatesan Thulasinath is a Co-founder and Partner at INTRVU, where he is responsible for Admissions and Career services advisory lines. He is also an avid reader, writer and a public speaker. At INTRVU, he also manages strategic partnerships with public and private organizations, embassies, universities and student associations. A former sales executive and industry expert, he is currently pursuing a PhD in Applied Polymer Physics at the University of Potsdam and holds a joint Masters degree in Polymer Science from HU,FU,TU Berlin and University of Potsdam.





BerlinScienceTalk

World Science Day for Peace and Development
(November 10, 2018)

Celebrated every 10 November, World Science Day for Peace and Development highlights the important role of science in society and the need to engage the wider public in debates on emerging scientific issues. It also underlines the importance and relevance of science in our daily lives. By linking science more closely with society, World Science Day for Peace and Development aims to ensure that citizens are kept informed of developments in science. It also underscores the role scientists play in broadening our understanding of the remarkable, fragile planet we call home and in making our societies more sustainable (by UNESCO).






Speakers

BerlinScienceTalk

Begoña

Co-Founder

Roobot-Academy

Why is it important to teach robotics to kids and teenagers

August 31, 2018

I will talk about how teaching robotics (by that I mean electronics, programming and mechanics) early on in schools is really important, because it teaches students early the technical skills they will need in the future, pushes them to develop creative ways to solve their problems and teaches them perseverance. It also empowers them to understand the world of technology, that they use every day.

I studied Industrial Engineering in Spain and did an Erasmus Exchange year in the University of Karlsruhe. I then started working for the automotive industry and after 3 years I decided I wasn't happy. I decided to spend 7 months in Cambodia working for an NGO teaching school age students science and electronics through experiments. I enjoyed it so much that I decided, my career was gonna move in that direction. After moving back to Germany it took me 2 years to find someone who had the same vision as me. We founded our company (Roobot-Academy) in March 2018.


BerlinScienceTalk

Jonas Schuba

Student

Unfallkrankenhaus

The responsibility of media teaching public knowledge exemplary explained on film as a medium.

August 31, 2018

Neuroscientists, artist and marketing geniuses agree on one thing: The brain does like stories. That’s nothing else than telling someone about a specific subject. This is the art of storytelling. One medium which has a lot of different options to do that is a film. I will lead you through the most essential tools a filmmaker would use to sell his story. This way we will find an answer to a delicate hypothesis typically applied to film: Can fiction have a stronger impact on society in teaching them something than an actual documentary? In the end, I will show you, what this means in reality.

Jonas Schuba has been studying film- and TV-science at "die medienakademie Berlin" cooperating with Mittweida University of Applied Sciences. He has been able to specialize on film direction from the first day on. 2017 he worked on his bachelor thesis about narrative strategies in 360°-videos. Today he has switched into the field of health care and is being trained to become a Surgical Technologist at Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, one of the most prominent German trauma centers.


BerlinScienceTalk

Sayan Paul

Ph.D. Student

Humboldt University of Berlin

Small molecule activation AKA, Tom and Jerry show

August 31, 2018

Oxidation catalysis as well as nitrogen fixation have an utter importance in industry and future food economy. This importance gave emergence of the field “small molecule activation” in past few decades. Different small molecules say for example Oxygen, Nitrogen etc. are supposed to be activated by means of a “catalyst” either homogeneously or heterogeneously. Homogenous catalysis is mainly done using Late transition metals or main group elements! (Technical term alert!!!!). Anyway, serendipitously, This part of science ,to be specific chemistry, is quite similar with one of the favorite Cartoon of our sweet childhood “Tom and jerry” ! There is a “Tom” and There is a “jerry”, “ Tom” is running after “ jerry” and the series continues ………….

Sayan is pursuing PhD at Humboldt University on “Small molecule Activation” with in AKLimberg. Sayan is a Part of Unicat cluster of excellence , Which is now going to be Unisyscat excellence initiative. The Concept of Unisyscat lies in excellent collaborative research with in all universities of berlin and Postdam (HU,FU,TU,FHI,MPI,UPostdam). The parts of Unisyscat ,where Sayan is contributing , are “Coupled chemo-catalytic centre” and “Coupled Chemo and bio-catalytic reactions”.


BerlinScienceTalk

Lee Stopak

Project Lead

Ada Health GmbH

Digital phenotyping and contextualized consumer genomics within Ada, an AI diagnostic app and clinical decision support tool

August 31, 2018

Ada is a personal health guide with a symptom assessment functionality that empowers users to learn and make more informed decisions about their health. Powered by a unique reasoning engine and curated medical content, Ada is able to assess clinical conditions with the highest accuracy available. Ada has been developed by physicians, scientists, and engineers over 7 years, has over 4 million users, 6 million completed symptom assessments, and is available for free in the App Store and in the Google Play Store, where the overall rating is 4.7/5 stars. During user onboarding, Ada collects relevant user data such as age, biological gender, smoking status, and history of high blood pressure. These factors allow for a basic personalization that is taken into account during diagnostic reasoning. To provide true personalization Ada must consider the genetic makeup of each user. This will allow not only for personal health risk monitoring, but also continuous health data collection from the population, which can then be used for future studies, discoveries, and ultimately applications in research and in commercial development. We will give an introduction to Ada, and then focus on how Ada is leveraging genetics to personalize AI diagnostics, bringing digital health and genomics together.

Lee is the project lead for genetics integration at Ada Health, a digital health startup in Berlin. Previously he had worked in many different labs doing basic research in fungus, insect, plant, and neurogenetics. Lee holds a dual BS degree in Neurobiology/Physiology and Finance from the University of Maryland, College Park, and completed his MSc in Medical Neurosciences from the Charité.


BerlinScienceTalk

Arobendo Mondal

Ph.D. Student

Technical University of Berlin

Quantum Chemistry: Never heard of that

Coming Soon

Quantum chemistry applies quantum mechanics to the theoretical study of chemical systems. It is a sub-discipline of chemistry that focuses on the properties and behavior of subatomic particles, primarily electrons. Without a foundational understanding of electron behavior, it would be impossible to understand the concepts of chemical bonding. It aims, in principle, to solve the Schrödinger equation for the system under scrutiny; however, its complexity for all but the simplest of atoms or molecules requires simplifying assumptions and approximations, creating a trade-off between accuracy and computational cost.

Arobendo is pursuing Ph.D studies in quantum chemistry at Technical University of Berlin, Germany. His Ph.D work is about development of methods and protocols for computation of paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters for solids, whose immediate applications are computation and simulation of pNMR shifts (chemical shifts) for sodium and lithium ion battery materials as well as metal-organic frameworks. Apart from these, he is also developing models to combine molecular dynamic simulations with EPR-NMR computations to include temperature dependencies for such parameters. He is a recipient of Marie-Curie fellowship, funded by European Union within the pNMR initial training network (ITN). This network is composed of 9 academic institutions and 3 industrial entities throughout Europe. As a result, he got opportunities to collaborate with research groups at ETH-Zürich and University of Zürich at Switzerland, University of Cambridge at United Kingdom and CIRMMP and GIOTTO Biotech at Florence, Italy.


BerlinScienceTalk

Dr. Christian Roth

Project Leader

Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces

Prison Break and Alzheimers.
How a little sugar connects it all.

July 27, 2018

The modification of intracellular proteins with N-Acetylglucosamine at serine or threonine emerged as a key player regulating a vast amount of cellular process including signalling, communication, transcription, protein stability and many more. We show how O-GlcNAc influences the aggregation of proteins and how the lack of O-GlcNAc plays a role in protein degradation and aggregation in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimers.

Christian is currently a project leader at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, working on the structural analysis of protein carbohydrate complexes using X-ray crystallography. Christian has a particular interest in enzymes modifying carbohydrates and how they achieve such exquisite specificity and catalytic efficiency. Till 2017, Christian worked at the University of York in the UK on enzymes involved in O-GlcNAc cycling.


BerlinScienceTalk

Dr. Yu Noda

Postdoctoral Researcher

Humboldt University of Berlin

Nano-touch on flatland? How to characterize electronic properties of two-dimensional nanomaterials

July 27, 2018

The smaller, the better? We all have small electronic devices in our pocket today, which was not at all imaginable some decades ago. Engineers work hard to make components of electronics smaller — with a transistor being the fundamental building block. As conventional silicon transistors approach the theoretical size limit, materials chemists find opportunities for developing new nano-materials with desired electrical properties. I will introduce some examples of new beyond-graphene organic materials for such candidates, and how a technique called conductive-atomic force microscopy can be a powerful tool.

Dr. Yu Noda is a postdoctoral scholar at Humboldt University of Berlin, currently working on nanoscience of two-dimensional polymeric materials. Yu completed his Ph.D. in Engineering at Pennsylvania State University, where he studied hydrolytic fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass for fuel. In 2016 he left USA to work in Prague (Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry), and recently moved to Berlin.


BerlinScienceTalk

João Louçano

Ph.D. student

GlycoUniverse, Berlin

Automation in carbohydrate chemistry and its impact in Glycosciences

July 27, 2018

Carbohydrates play a role as biochemical labels. For instance, they allow living organisms to differentiate red blood cells according to the ABO system, or to identify foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses. Studying the fine mechanisms by which carbohydrates interact with other biological structures can be done using pure samples of different carbohydrates. From a chemical stand point, preparing carbohydrate samples is a tedious, expensive and time-consuming task. In this talk, I will present how solid-phase chemistry associated with automation can bring about a change in the glycoscience field by providing on-demand access to a variety of carbohydrate structures.

João Louçano works at GlycoUniverse in Berlin. João is developing and optimizing methods in automated solid-phase oligosaccharide synthesis using the commercially available synthesizer Glyconeer® 2.0. As a fellow of the European Training Network GLYCOVAX, he has a collaborative research interest in understanding the mechanism of the carbohydrate vaccines. The strategy relies on the benefits of the automated solid-phase synthesis to prepare a library of chemically defined glycans derived from the capsular polysaccharide of Group B Streptococcus (GBS). The library can be used in carbohydrate-protein interaction studies and the knowledge generated is expected to impact the development and production of new safer and more effective vaccines against GBS infections.


BerlinScienceTalk

Aarti Swaminathan

Ph.D. student

Charite Medical University, Berlin

Key for a good night's sleep? The slow wave sleep in the hippocampus

July 27, 2018

Slow wave sleep in the hippocampus is important for memory consolidation. In my PhD, I have tried to understand the role of a cell type called Mossy cells in the hilus/dentate gyrus area.

Aarti Swaminathan graduated in 2014 from University of Göttingen in Neuroscience. She is currently a final year PhD student in the lab of Dietmar Schmitz at Charite Medical University, Berlin under NeuroCure Phd fellowship. She is interested in studing neuronal mechanisms of hippocampal oscillations.


BerlinScienceTalk

Tuur Mertens

Ph.D. student

Technical University of Berlin

What is Happening to my Beer !
The Headache called ‘Beer Flavour Stability’

July 27, 2018

Beer is not a stable product and within three months from packaging, it is already turning stale/old. Overcoming this problem is the holy grail of brewing. In this talk, I will answer a few basic questions: what is beer flavour stability, why is it important, what causes beer to turn stale, and what can be done about it.

Tuur Mertens (Brewing Science) is a second year PhD student at the Technical University of Berlin. He is currently researching ways to reduce the (transition) metal content during brewing, in his quest to prolong the flavor stability and shelf life of beer. The talk will be about why we don’t want these metals in beer and what we can potentially do about it.


BerlinScienceTalk

Raman Venkatesan Thulasinath

Co-founder

INTRVU

Online job applications for PhDs transitioning to Industry

August 10, 2018

In Germany, about 3 million people are looking for jobs at any given day. Despite their qualifications, many PhDs face challenges in landing industry positions they are well-qualified for. This is due to a lack of understanding of the online job application process that most applicants are unaware of.

Raman Venkatesan Thulasinath is a Co-founder and Partner at INTRVU, where he is responsible for Admissions and Career services advisory lines. He is also an avid reader, writer and a public speaker. At INTRVU, he also manages strategic partnerships with public and private organizations, embassies, universities and student associations. A former sales executive and industry expert, he is currently pursuing a PhD in Applied Polymer Physics at the University of Potsdam and holds a joint Masters degree in Polymer Science from HU,FU,TU Berlin and University of Potsdam.


BerlinScienceTalk

Dr. Chris Armbruster

Director

10,000 Data Scientists for Europe

Postdoc or Industry? Choices and opportunities for PhDs in the AI revolution

June 26, 2018

You are a PhD or Postdoc wondering what your next move should be? You are looking to better understand what a move to industry would mean for you? You have been internationally mobile and need more insight?
Let's speak for 90 minutes about the following issues.
1. If pursuing a postdoc career, what do I need to watch out for? How do I find out what my chances are of making tenure? When do I get out before it is too late?
2. In considering a switch to industry, what do I need to do to get interviews and find the best job? How do I start the search?
3. If I have been mobile internationally, and perhaps don't speak German (fluently), how do I move forward nevertheless?

Dr. Chris Armbruster is a Max Planck alumnus who is supporting PhD talent in transitioning to new challenges in Data & AI. Earlier, he worked on innovation systems (including postdoc careers), and rolled out digital infrstructures to the MPI. Chris is from Berlin but spent much of his life abroad in Africa, Asia, and Europe. He runs the campaign 10,000 Data Scientists for Europe and would like to hear from you if you are interested in Data & AI.



Graduate Schools, scholarships and research grants

International scholarships

Doctoral programs in Berlin (100 programs)

PhD scholarships at HU Berlin

Graduate programs at TU Berlin

Berlin Mathematical School (BMS)

Unifying Concepts in Catalysis (UniCat)

International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS)

Berlin International Graduate School of Natural Sciences and Engineering (BIG-NSE)

School of Analytical Sciences Adlershof (SALSA)


Universities and research institutes

Public Universities

Free University of Berlin (FU Berlin)

Humboldt University of Berlin (HU Berlin)

Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin)

Charité medical school (one of the largest university hospitals in Europe)

University of Potsdam

Berlin University of the Arts (UdK)

Max-Planck Institutes

Fritz Haber Institute of the MPG (FHI)

Max Planck Institute for Human Development

Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology

Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (MOLGEN)

Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

Archives of the Max Planck Society

Fraunhofer Institutes

Fraunhofer Heinrich-Hertz-Institut

Fraunhofer-Institut für Nachrichtentechnik

Fraunhofer Institute for Open Communication Systems

Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology (IPK)

Fraunhofer-Institut für Rechnerarchitektur und Softwaretechnik

Fraunhofer-Institut für Software- und Systemtechnik ISST

Fraunhofer-Institut für Zuverlässigkeit und Mikrointegration (IZM)

Helmholtz Centers

Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine

Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (BESSY)

German Aerospace Center

Leibniz Institutes

Ferdinand-Braun-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik

Leibniz-Institut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP)

Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB)

Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung (IKZ)

Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW)

Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI)

Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Leibniz-Institut (PDI)

Weierstraß-Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS)

Leibniz-Sozietät der Wissenschaften zu Berlin

Deutsches Institut für Internationale Pädagogische Forschung (DIPF)

German Institute for Economic Research

Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum Berlin (DRFZ)

Leibniz-Institut für Sozialwissenschaften (GESIS)

Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften - ISAS

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (MfN)

WZB Berlin Social Science Center

Private Universities

ESCP Europe Wirtschaftshochschule Berlin

Hertie School of Governance

Steinbeis-Hochschule Berlin (SHB)

ESMT European School of Management and Technology

Touro College Berlin

International Psychoanalytic University Berlin

More research institutes

Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften

Biologische Bundesanstalt für Land- und Forstwirtschaft

Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM)

Bundesinstitut für Risikobewertung

Telekom Innovation Laboratories

German Archaeological Institute (DAI)

Deutsches Bibliotheksinstitut

Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin

Deutsches Institut für Urbanistik

Ecologic Institute: Science and Policy for a Sustainable World

Fachinformationszentrum Chemie

Institute for Cultural Inquiry

Institute of Electronic Business

Zuse Institute Berlin (ZIB)

Otto Suhr Institute of Political Science

Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)

Robert Koch Institute - RKI

Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP)

Umweltbundesamt

Institute for Advanced Study, Berlin

WZB Berlin Social Science Center

Science City Berlin Adlershof

Institut für Museumsforschung

Institut für Ökologische Wirtschaftsforschung

Institute for Media and Communication Studies

Colleges of Applied Sciences

Alice Salomon Hochschule Berlin

Bard College Berlin

Berlin School of Economics and Law

Internationale Berufsakademie Berlin (IBA)

Beuth Hochschule für Technik Berlin

CODE University of Applied Sciences

Design Akademie Berlin

German Academy for Film and Television Berlin

Evangelische Fachhochschule

https://www.eh-berlin.de/startseite.html

Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft Berlin

Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin

Fachhochschule für Verwaltung und Rechtspflege Berlin

Hochschule für Musik "Hanns Eisler" Berlin

Hochschule für Schauspielkunst Ernst Busch

IBS International Business School Berlin

Katholische Fachhochschule

Katholische Hochschule für Sozialwesen Berlin

Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weißensee (Hochschule für Gestaltung)

Mediadesign Hochschule

OTA private University of applied sciences Berlin

Teikyo University, Berlin campus

BAU International Berlin University of Applied Sciences


Coordinator

Arobendo Mondal


Team members

João Louçano

Tanistha Gupta

Jonas Schuba

Yunha Hwang

Priyanka Banerjee

Mayur Vadhvani

Vlada Pleshcheva

Sayan Paul

Kazi Atikur Rahman


Follow Us


Feedback


Begoña (Co-Founder of Roobot-Academy)

Thank you for all the love, encouragement and feedback. It was a really interesting and fun event filled with amazing people


Toni (Ph.D. Student)

This is something I was missing in Berlin. Such a useful initiative.



Sponsors



Partners


TEDxHUBerlin



Event partners


INTRVU

INTRVU is an Independent Advisory focusing on Admissions, Career (Jobs & Internships), Institutional, and Entrepreneurial services.They with prospective students, job seekers, institutions and entrepreneurs and help them achieve their career and business goals through our proven frameworks, processes and methodologies. They work with their clients on individual basis and leverage their proprietary products, services, insights and frameworks to equip their clients with unique insights and give them an edge in the competitive landscape.


10,000 Data Scientists for Europe

10,000 Data Scientists for Europe has the mission of finding and empowering new talent as rapidly as possible: 10,000 Data Scientists and Machine Learners capable of designing and producing the data-driven products of the 21st century. Currently, we run workshops with PhDs interested in Data & AI careers, and also support CV re-writing and job search, which you can find at eventbrite. Early 2019, we launch a community for PhDs and Postdocs seeking impact in industry and startups, and you can join us at Facebook



Initiate "Science Talk" at your city

In today's world of collaborative research, its just not enough to be “good” at science, but, it is equally important to be strongly connected to other researchers in our vicinity. A well connected academic network is like a two-edged sword. Firstly, it helps propagate ideas among the researchers, and secondly, it makes space for more information to reach the individuals new to this field.
Most often, we discover that due to poor communication and networking, the same problems continue to persist from one "batch" of researchers to the next. And, not surprisingly, most of them can be solved just by speaking and exchanging ideas with each other.
So, through “Science Talks”, we can create platforms where everyone shares, and learns together.

Please register your city, and let the talks begin!!!

REGISTER


Go for Science - an ocean of opportunities

It’s said that “Success is where preparation and opportunity meet”. However, most often, the gap between the two becomes difficult to bridge due to a dearth of platforms that can provide necessary information regarding opportunities available in terms of PhD positions, scholarships, academic jobs, etc. Consequently, Go for Science was launched as a platform in order to overcome this very gap. It provides a unique and exciting blend of information regarding scholarships, PhD positions, etc. and first hand experiences of scholarship holders and students pursuing higher studies across the globe. In other words, GfS ensures that potential young talents not only get sufficient knowledge about opportunities (such as scholarships, PhD positions, internships, etc) “straight out of the books”, but also get a feeling of “real life experiences” that students share on the website.

As of now, quite a number of students have already benefitted from GfS’s plethora of information regarding opportunities in scientific research, and have set out towards achieving their dreams. Therefore, looking at the overwhelming response from students, it aims to further expand its knowledge base, not only in terms of providing information regarding scholarships etc, but also enriching it with several first hand experiences of students.




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